Thursday, April 26, 2012

What is the cost of true independence?

What is independence and what is it's cost?

Today is Independence Day in Israel. Last night, folks, young and old, joined in circles and danced in the streets.  I've been contemplating the meaning of independence.   A quick search in the dictionary brought up: "Freedom from the control, influence, support, aid, or the like, of others".

If this is true, does this mean that it's opposite is dependency? Is  there a difference between dependence and dependency?

Lester Levensen, a truly wise and free being, one of the huge gifts of my life, had this to say:

"A dependency relationship does not allow you to think for yourself, admits you are dependent on another human being, and prevents you from seeing your infinity. Conformity is dependency, is having to do what others do, wanting their approval. And independent person is always an oddball, not understood by society".

His continual prodding would stir me up, My own experience has found this to be true. Societies are set up for the individuals within them, to get along. Conformity is a necessary. You can express yourself as long as you don't stir the waters too much.

When your own truth differs from the consensus, it stirs up contention. The system is not set up to support the freedom of authentic independent voice of each individual.

When you are truly dedicated to your independence you risk being ousted from the group. I believe that this is the reason why, the biggest fear we humans possess, after the fear of death, is the fear of public speaking.

I also believe that this is the root cause of our Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde existence... yearning to express the voice of our hearts... then in the actual moment, speaking what seems to be the most politically or socially correct thing to "get along" and keep us safe.

Yet is it really safe when the cost of this "safety" is the price of your own inner truth.
Are truly independent people doomed to be always be the oddball, not understood by society?

What do you think?

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